Space Force Offers First Peek at Camouflage Uniform

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A nametape and camouflage utility uniform pattern for the new U.S. Space Force.
This photo shared via Twitter depicts a nametape and camouflage utility uniform pattern for the new U.S. Space Force. (U.S. Space Force via Twitter).

The United States Space Force has only one member so far, but it appears the service utility uniform is already well under development.

The official Twitter account of the month-old military service posted a teaser photograph Friday night appearing to show a variant of the Operational Camouflage Pattern used by the Army and Air Force.

Above the left breast pocket in Navy embroidery reads: U.S. Space Force.

"The first #SpaceForce utility uniform nametapes have touched down in the Pentagon," the tweet read.

The uniform depicts four-star rank, indicating that the uniform belongs to Gen. John "Jay" Raymond, the first commander of U.S. Space Force. It also has the Command Space Operations badge embroidered above the service nametape.

On the left sleeve of the uniform is the United States Space Command patch, denoting the military's newest combatant command, formed shortly before Space Force itself activated Dec. 20. And above that patch is a full-color American flag patch -- a departure from the flags that soldiers and airmen typically wear on their right shoulders in OCP uniform.

Many questions remain. Space Force has yet to announce a rank structure, a full system of uniforms or even what to call members of the new service. In a Thursday briefing, Pentagon spokesman Jonathan Hoffman said Raymond was developing a plan regarding every detail.

"We've got some steps to go through," he said. "General Raymond's team has a -- a massive, incredibly well thought out and planned implementation process for ... uniforms, pay, songs, that they need to go through to get a Space Force ... I don't know the timeline on it but we can probably get you guys an update on some Space Force-related issues in the near future."

Editor's Note: This story has been updated to improve the accuracy of the description of flag placement.

-- Hope Hodge Seck can be reached at hope.seck@military.com. Follow her on Twitter at @HopeSeck.

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