Wounded Warrior Project Pledges $10 Million to Help Vets in Crisis Amid Pandemic

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A soldier sports the Wounded Warrior Project logo as he prepares to ruck in the Seattle Rock N' Roll Marathon June 22, 2013. (U.S. Army/Sgt. Jennifer Spradlin)
A soldier sports the Wounded Warrior Project logo as he prepares to ruck in the Seattle Rock N' Roll Marathon June 22, 2013. (U.S. Army/Sgt. Jennifer Spradlin)

One of the most prominent and well-funded organizations serving wounded troops and their families announced Thursday it's committing $10 million to help meet the most pressing needs of those in its community who are in economic straits due to the novel coronavirus pandemic.

Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) will contact all the wounded warriors registered in its database to locate those in financial stress, the organization said in an announcement. Those who can't cover food or housing costs due to loss of household income can apply for a $1,000 grant.

"This support, combined with our mental and physical health and wellness programs, will aid the most vulnerable veteran families in our community," according to the announcement.

WWP is also inviting other organizations serving veterans to match the $10 million commitment in order to meet the needs of more vets. Organization officials emphasized that not everyone who applies will receive aid; some will not meet urgent need qualifications, and others who qualify may be turned away when funds are exhausted.

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If WWP has its funding commitment matched by other organizations, it will be able to provide one-time grants to 20,000 veterans.

"These are unprecedented times, and we must do all we can to meet the immediate financial needs of wounded warriors and their families," Mike Linnington, WWP CEO and a retired Army lieutenant general, said in a statement. "Due to their injuries and service-connected disabilities, our nation's wounded and injured veterans are at great risk. ... We call on others to assist so we may help as many warriors and their families in crisis as possible in this difficult time."

Linnington added that those who aren't able to obtain direct financial aid can avail themselves of other Wounded Warrior Project programs, which are offered free and targeted at improving the mental, physical and financial health of wounded troops.

According to publicly available financial statements, WWP took in nearly $282.5 million and spent more than $282.6 million in fiscal 2018; it finished the year with nearly $308.8 million in assets. In 2019, according to the organization, it invested more than $200 million in programs serving wounded warriors and their families.

-- Hope Hodge Seck can be reached at hope.seck@military.com. Follow her on Twitter at @HopeSeck.

Read more: The Latest on the Military's COVID-19 Response

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