Cruise Ship Carrying Sightseers Collides with World War II Destroyer Floating Museum

The USS Slater arrives in the Port of Albany on July 1, 2014, after three months of hull repairs in Staten Island. The Slater, the last Destroyer Escort afloat in the United States, was launched in 1944 and served in both the Atlantic and Pacific theaters of operations during World War II. The USS Slater's paint scheme has been returned to her 1945 dazzle camouflage. Sazzle camouflage refers to a purposely confusing paint scheme meant to distract the enemy. (AP Photo/The Daily Gazette, Marc Schultz)
The USS Slater arrives in the Port of Albany on July 1, 2014, after three months of hull repairs in Staten Island. The Slater, the last Destroyer Escort afloat in the United States, was launched in 1944 and served in both the Atlantic and Pacific theaters of operations during World War II. The USS Slater's paint scheme has been returned to her 1945 dazzle camouflage. Sazzle camouflage refers to a purposely confusing paint scheme meant to distract the enemy. (AP Photo/The Daily Gazette, Marc Schultz)

Guests on a sightseeing tour got to see what happens when a cruise ship collides with another boat.

A ship operated by Dutch Apple Cruises struck another vessel on the Hudson River near Albany, New York, on Tuesday. Footage captured by one of the passengers shows the moment that the ships hit, with someone aboard the cruise repeatedly saying "not good, not good, not good" before the collision.

The Dutch Apple II was returning to dock when the incident occurred, the Times Union reported. Nobody got hurt, but the Dutch Apple II reportedly suffered minor damage.

The Coast Guard ordered the cruise ship not to carry any passengers until the cause of the collision could be investigated.

A passenger on the cruise ship captured footage of the incident and posted it to Twitter. She captioned it, "Onboard the Dutch Apple Cruises Troy Lock Sightseeing Tour and we just hit the U.S.S. Slater. Captain heard stating, 'I lost transmissions.'"

In a statement obtained by Fox News, a spokesperson for Dutch Apple Cruises said, "We were instructed to not carry passengers until the U.S. Coast Guard came to do an inspection. Which is standard procedure after any incident."

"After our USCG inspection yesterday, it was deemed that there was an error using the transmission throttle, which caused the engine to come out of gear while trying to dock," the statement continues.

"This, combined with very high winds, caused the boat to quickly drift into the USS Slater. The US Coast Guard has deemed the Dutch Apple to be in perfect working condition, no engine or transmission issues and no structural damage. Only superficial damage was assessed to the boarding doors, which have already been replaced. They also gave us clearance to begin operations again as of yesterday. We have already been out on three cruises since then and have resumed normal operations."

The Dutch Apple II was reportedly ready to take on passengers by Wednesday afternoon.

The USS Slater is a decommissioned World War II destroyer that now serves as a museum. According to the Times Union, it was also open to visitors on Wednesday.

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