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We Can Take the FRG from Annoying to Needed

Family embrace their Soldier of 3rd Infantry Division Sustainment Brigade minutes prior to his departure. (U.S. Army/Candace Mundt)
Family embrace their Soldier of 3rd Infantry Division Sustainment Brigade minutes prior to his departure. (U.S. Army/Candace Mundt)

The Family Readiness Group (FRG) -- it is almost an obscene word to some of us. To others it's like a bad taste in our mouths. Remember that one time one spouse got a little power hungry and decided to push "rank?" Or maybe you just chalk the whole thing up to be nothing better than a rumor mill or someone trying to get brownie points.

You know what, I get it -- I really do. Take it from someone who has dragged their feet when asked to volunteer. I think most all of us have been there at some time -- reluctant to participate, hesitant to step up, disinclined to be a part of the FRG.

Do you ever think that maybe the problem isn't the FRG itself? Perhaps it is not even really the people who make up the FRG. (Or insert your other problem with the FRG here.)

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Maybe the real problem is that it is just another commitment to add to our already too crowded lives. Maybe it's that to us who are the "family" part of the readiness group, the is whole thing just something else to add to our already much to long list. It is another obligation to fulfill, and an addition to the endless boxes to check. It is something we have to add to our already overwhelmed lives.

I understand. We are spouses, husbands, wives, caregivers, stay at home moms and working professionals. We are keeper of our homes. We are the very foundations that make the Army life work. We are the ones to pick up the slack, sometimes daily, for our service members.

Could it be possible the real problem with the FRG is that many of us wish instead of adding one more thing to the list, we could take one thing away?

But I suggest that this is the very reason we actually do need the FRG. We want more than information and resources. We need support. We need encouragement. We need help, and guidance, and the ability to prepare for this lifestyle. We need the tribe, community and support FRG offers.

Instead of trying to spearhead our lives on our own, or complaining about the lack of a "tribe" we should be reaching out.

What if instead of looking at it as more box checking, we considered the FRG as that needed conduit? What if instead of seeing it as an annoying, useless extra task we saw it as the way forward?

Let's make the FRG a great thing again. Let us do it together.

 

Sina is a proud military wife, sister, and daughter. When she’s not busy crafting, reading, gardening, baking, or volunteering, you can find her managing her Virtual Assistant business and writing her blog, LivingbytheMargin.com.

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